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Medical marijuana is helping patients across the country (including some school-age children). But I’m sure most people would agree that medical marijuana is not the kind of thing that should fall into the hands of unwitting kids. School kids at risk for pot-laced edibles? However, that’s just what happened in New Mexico when a nine-year-old […]

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A 14-year-old boy suffering from a rare condition called polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, which causes scar-like tissue to develop instead of bones, has passed away just days after surgery. For almost 12 years, Emanuel Zayas was battling the condition. Once doctors successfully removed the basketball-sized tumor, initial signs were encouraging. However, due to kidney and lung complications […]

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Dear_Mark_Inline_PhotoFor today’s edition of Dear Mark, I’m answering four questions from readers. The first question is actually 5 questions, so it’s closer to 8 questions overall. Good deal. First, I answer 5 questions about exercise, jumping jacks, aerobic base building, and weighted hiking. Next, what’s my take on hunting? After that, I discuss a few different ways to approach pull-ups. And finally, what is my quick and dirty advice for those with type 1 diabetes trying to go Primal?

Let’s go:

Chad asked:

Very interesting read, lot to chew over with this one. As far as what I would like to see in future posts or books: what alternative exercises could you do for aerobic base-building efforts per Primal Endurance guidelines?

Is running in place better than jumping jacks? Does the elliptical have a place? How often is too often for hiking with a weight vest? And how much lower can you go under your 180-age before you need to worry about *not* getting an adequate training effect.

These could all be dedicated posts, as you mention. But I’ll do some quick rapid fire responses.

  1. Literally any activity that keeps you under or at a heart rate of 180 minus age is building your aerobic base. The question is finding one that you enjoy doing, but not so much that you get carried away and turn it into an intense session. The real fun lies in doing nothing but “easy” movement and watching your aerobic threshold rise.
  2. Jumping jacks are better than running in place. They’re enough to augment bone mass in both kids and adults. Jumping jacks really get short changed.
  3. The elliptical has a place. I like it for high intensity intervals, rather than long, slow aerobic work. If your joints can’t handle the hard impacts of running or sprinting, ellipticals are a decent option.
  4. Depends on the amount of weight in the vest, the grade of the climb, your experience hiking with weight. In my experience, the hardest part about rucking/hiking with weight has always been the downhill portion. That’s where the leg cramping sets in, especially if you’ve been going for miles or days. If you’re going with a nice 20-35 pounds, I’d say you could go as often as you would without a vest. That’s like carrying a toddler around—which many unfit people already do—only the weight is more evenly distributed and thus easier to bear.
  5. It’s a long tail. There’s probably some area under the curve that would suggest time X heart rate equals workload. The point would be that you still get some amount of significant training from a four-hour hike at a heart rate significantly below your MAF. However, the training would not serve you necessarily as much if you were training for, say, an elite level marathon.

Brad Kearns has a great analogy he uses to talk about the effectiveness of low-low intensity movement. Imagine a cruise ship with 12 engines. Going 25 knots in the open sea, all 12 engines are going full blast. To putter around the harbor, it might only use 2 of those engines at half-speed—but those 2 engines are still being used, still being “trained.”

Patrick wondered:

At age 30 I just took my hunter safety course and am excited to begin my own hunting practice. I think a deep primal exploration of our hunting roots would help bridge the gap for many who haven’t considered our ancestral connection to hunting and the outdoors. Basically, it’s a meaty topic that I’d deerly like to hear Mark and the gang’s opinion on.

Check out this older post. I’ll try to get something more fresh up in the coming weeks or months.

Kerri requested:

I would love to see an article about alternate ways to do pull/ups

You’ve got pull-ups—palms facing forward. A little more lat-centric.

You’ve got chin-ups—palms facing behind you. A little more bicep-centric.

You’ve got neutral grip pull-ups—palms facing each other. Easier on the shoulders, good for people with poor shoulder flexibility.

You’ve got fingertip pull-ups—a training staple of climbers.

One of my favorite ways to do pull-ups (any kind) is with ladders. Start with 2 pull-ups. Wait 30 seconds. Do 3. Wait 30 seconds. Do 4. Wait 30 seconds. Start the ladder over again. Make sure each rep feels crisp; you don’t want to grind out the steps of the ladder. I’ve seen people who can maybe do 5-6 pull-ups in a row do three rounds of this ladder without much problem. This allows you to accumulate great volume, really grease the groove of the movement, get stronger, increase max reps, and reduce the risk of overtraining or straining. If 2-3-4 ladders are too easy, you can step it up to 3-4-5. Too hard? 1-2-3.

Suzanne said:

I would love more HIIT/primal tips for type 1 diabetics. Thanks Mark

Everything Primal applies, just more so.

Ditch gluten. And I mean all of it. Gluten-free diets have been shown to reduce T1D-related antibodies and lower gut inflammation in those with type 1 diabetes. If you’re young enough, you might even be able to halt and reverse the degeneration of your pancreatic beta cells and get off insulin altogether with a gluten-free diet, if this case report is anything to go on.

Vitamin D, strength training, micronutrient intake, and all the other pro-bone stuff become more critical, as people with type 1 diabetes already have an increased risk of low bone density.

Sleep is everything; impaired insulin sensitivity is a common T1D response to deranged circadian rhythms and inadequate sleep.

As for HIIT, less is more. Interval training has the tendency to raise blood sugar in people with type 1 diabetes. In one study, moderate cycling lowered blood glucose, while adding a quick 10-second all out sprint increased it. They even proposed using these 10-second sprints as alternative modifiers of blood glucose. Interesting stuff.

The bulk of your training should be strength training, lots of walking, and a ton of easy movement. Keep the intense sprints/HIIT for special occasions.

Oh, and consider going keto, or at least just low-carb. This should be a no-brainer, and many doctors are embracing it for their patients with type 1 diabetes, but you may have to push the issue with your doctor. Be sure to keep him or her in the loop.

That’s it for today, folks. Thanks for asking, thanks for reading, and thanks for chiming in below with your own input for today’s round of questions.

Take care.

The post Dear Mark: Exercise Rapid Fire, Hunting, Pull-ups, Type 1 Diabetes appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

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Inline_Live-Awesome-645x445-03A lot of people come to the Primal Blueprint having felt lousy for many years. It might be because of excess weight, medical issues, or general lack of energy.

The point is, many of these folks have forgotten how to feel—let alone cultivate—basic physical pleasure in their lives. When you live with constant pain or fatigue, it can be hard to imagine the other side of the spectrum, and that’s okay. Just take action to move yourself there—each and every day.

In other words, take the time and effort to feel good again on a daily basis. Living Primally will do its work in easing the physiological issues, but it’s important to inject pleasure into your lifestyle (e.g. get a massage, take a better bath, relish really good food, feel the sun on your face, tune into the sensory elements of your day).

The idea here is to reorient your experience of your body. Find ways to feel good, and you’ll be motivated to live a life that supports pleasure as a dimension of full well-being.

For more on the pleasure principle, continue reading here.

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The post Primal Challenge Point: Embrace the Pleasure Principle appeared first on Mark’s Daily Apple.

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Sometimes, the best thing your coach can tell you is “no.”

When Rochelle Basil tossed her running shoes to the back of the closet after a collegiate career that nearly broke her, she assumed it was for good. But years later, the marathon came calling, and she had to answer. After an injury ended her first training cycle, she hired a coach. He promptly told her she wasn’t to race her first marathon; she would do it as a workout. And work out she did, following his plan to the letter, and turning in a scorching time along the way.

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Stand strong and organized- tension helps build strength, provided we stay engaged in the process.


Day 285 Of 360

Back squat:
5 x 5 @ (up to) 75% of 2RM
1 x 10 @ 50%
3 x 5L, 5R @ 30-40% (as kettlebell back squat)

 

Rest as needed between sets. If sets require interruption, make as minor an adjustment as needed and complete the next uninterrupted. When the scheme is listed as “1 x 10,″ it always refers to “Sets” x “Reps”.

 

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The treadmill is one of those companions you should see casually like a work acquaintance—a relationship that helps you perform better at your real job.

When I was a kid, the old school hamster homes with the tubes and the hamster wheel were all the rage. Being neat freaks, my parents wouldn’t let my brother and I have one, but the idea of the hamster structure still made an impression.

 

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Imagine you’re enjoying a stellar post-meal conversation with your spouse when you suddenly clutch your chest in agony. You silently curse yourself for gobbling down a huge ribeye steak and an overabundant side of truffle fries for dinner. That pain is acid reflux, and it can happen at the most embarrassing moments. Acid reflux happens […]

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The world’s greatest makeup and beauty enthusiasts know how important eyebrows are to your overall look, yet having the perfect eyebrows is hard — especially if you suffer from thin brows. Those who are blessed with thick eyebrows have the ability to shape them up as they please… but what about those of us that […]

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The scent of cardamom and the bright red tartness of lingonberries in this roasted chicken will bring flavor to your meal prep this week.

Chicken and turkey are popular for being high in protein and low in saturated fats making a mealtime staple for athletes as well as in many healthy eating households. Falling back on the same old recipes starts to become mundane and a little too routine.

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